Rhino

Special Delivery! Endangered White Rhino Born At West Midland Safari Park...

West Midland Safari Park is celebrating the birth of its fourth southern white rhino in five years. 

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Third-time-mum, Ailsa, gave birth to the male rhino calf during the early hours of Monday 24th May, following a pregnancy of 16 months.  

Under the watchful eye of eleven-year-old mum, the little one was given a brief health check by his Keepers who were able to confirm he already weighed in at 74 kilograms (11 and a half stone) and was doing very well. 

The baby boy is another triumph for the Park in championing their breeding programme for white rhino. Two-and-a-half-year-old male, Granville, who was born in 2018, was the last white rhino born at the Park, and now has a new baby brother to join him out on the reserves.  

Head of Wildlife, Angela Potter, said, “We are absolutely delighted to welcome a new white rhino calf. He is a very strong boy and has been growing in confidence settling in well since his birth last week. This is Ailsa’s third time as a mother, and as expected she’s been wonderful – we are very proud of her.    

“With each rhino birth we have here at the Park, it’s a fantastic achievement for the European Endangered Species programme. All five species of rhino are decreasing in numbers, and we hope that this birth can continue in helping to bring more attention to the plight of rhino species in the wild.” 

White rhinos are the larger of the two African rhino species, they are fairly social animals and live in loose groups in the wild of up to six animals. Their skin is grey in colour and not white, in fact it is no different in colour from black rhinos despite the names! 

With wild rhinos continually facing a threat of poaching and habitat loss, the Park are committed to continuing their breeding programme, which works to create a reserve population of these magnificent animals who are listed as near threatened on the IUC red list. At the last count, just over 20,000 wild southern white rhinos remained in South Africa. 

Although the new-born is yet to be named, the Park is asking the public to make the final decision from a shortlist of names supplied by their keepers, which will take place next week. The name will begin with ‘J’, as all names of babies born at the Park in 2021 will begin with this letter. 

The youngster has already made his first tentative steps into his paddock and will eventually join his brother, Granville, on the Safari Drive-through within the next week.  

The new birth now brings the ‘crash’ of southern white rhino at the Safari up to seven. This includes the new arrival’s father, fifteen-year-old Barney, who himself was born at the Park in 2005. 


Black Rhino Calf Makes Public Debut At Taronga Western Plains Zoo Dubbo

 

Minister for Climate Change and the Environment, Frank Sartor yesterday announced the public debut of Taronga Western Plains Zoo’s latest addition – a baby Black Rhinoceros calf.

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“The little female rhino was born on 17 February to first-time mother Bakhita,” Mr Sartor said.“It is the second generation born in the zoo’s breeding program.“It’s terrific that this baby Rhino has become available for public viewing in time for the school holidays.”

A public competition will be announced shortly to name the baby Rhino.

The zoo is widely recognised as a world-class open range zoo, which has an international reputation in Black Rhinoceros breeding, research and conservation. Since the 1990s, the Zoo’s breeding program has produced 11 Black Rhinoceros calves, supporting the survival of this critically endangered species. In total, the zoo is home to almost 1,000 animals.

Mr Sartor said Taronga Western Plains Zoo has been experiencing a recent baby boom – currently on display are four Cheetah Cubs, three Giraffe calves and a Przewalski's Horse foal.

“This baby boom is fantastic for conservation and tourism with 70% of visitors to Dubbo going specifically to visit the zoo,” Mr Sartor said. “Visitors to Dubbo will also be able to see four Cheetah cubs, including two King Cheetah, believed to be two of only 60 King Cheetah in the world.”

Taronga Western Plains Zoo Keepers, such as Nick Hanlon have been monitoring Bakhita and her calf closely to ensure the pair is bonding.

“Bakhitais a fantastic first time mother, doing everything right from the moment she gave birth,” Mr. Hanlon said. “The calf is quite confident and inquisitive but still doesn’t venture too far from mum’s side. “She is quite active and loves a run around the paddock, but like most youngsters she gets tired pretty quickly. “At birth the calf weighed about 30kg and now would be around 40kg. “In time the calf will also play an important role in the international breeding program, either here or at another Zoo.”


Black Rhino Calf’s First Mud Bath At Dubbo Zoo

Taronga Western Plains Zoo’s Black Rhino calf has had its first mud bath, frolicking with mother Bakhita in the muddy conditions produced by recent rainfall in Dubbo.

Bakhita and the calf enjoyed a wallow in the mud before playfully running through puddles in their behind-the-scenes paddock.

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The female Black Rhino calf is now one month old and has been named Sabi Star (pronounced Sarbi Star) by Zoo Keepers. The name was chosen after the beautiful, rare and much loved flower found in Zimbabwe. The Sabi Star only flowers during harsh dry periods which keepers felt signified the struggle for life all livings things face in the wild.

“We all felt the name was so fitting and given the calf’s confident and curious personality, she will no doubt be a star ambassador for her species,” said Black Rhino Keeper Jake Williams  

“Sabi Star is progressing really well and now weighs over 80kgs. She is putting on approximately one kilogram a day.”

Each calf born has an individual personality and it has been evident from day one that Sabi Star is the most confident and inquisitive calf born at the Zoo to date.

Experienced mum Bakhita is continuing to show all the right maternal behaviours which is so important as Black Rhino calves learn from their mothers. They learn what to eat and how to react and respond to new situations, so having a relaxed and calm mother will ensure the calf is also relaxed and calm.

“Sabi Star currently spends most of her time feeding, mimicking her mum’s behaviours, exploring her environment and sleeping. She is growing in confidence every day and follows the lead of Bakhita when going for a gallop around the paddock or exploring the newly formed puddles.”

“She has already started mouthing and exploring food that is provided to her mum and over the course of the next 6 – 12 months she will continue to suckle whilst increasing her intake of solid food,” said Jake.

It is hoped that Bakhita and Sabi Star will make their public debut in early May, in the meantime regular updates are being provided via the Zoo’s social media channels.

Black Rhinos are currently listed as critically endangered with estimates that there are less than 6000 remaining in the wild.

Taronga Western Plains Zoo is internationally renowned for its Black Rhino conservation breeding program and actively funds and supports conservation efforts for wild rhinos in Africa, Indonesia and India. Funding and support for habitat protection and restoration, anti-poaching and rhino protection units and the reduction of human-animal conflict are all vital to ensure Rhino species will continue to survive in the wild.


Rhino Calf Debuts at Lee Richardson Zoo

Ayubu, the black rhino calf born at Lee Richardson Zoo, made his outdoor debut on March 8, 2021.  He was a little hesitant at first.  Mom was the first to peek out, checking out the noises from the nearby construction at Garden Rapids at the Big Pool.  She then went back and forth a few times until they were both outside.  Their first adventure outside together included exploring the top of the dirt mound, running all over the yard, and somewhat synchronized mud baths.

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Many zoo staff were watching the occasion, either in person or via closed-circuit cameras, as well as zoo guests. 

“This is one of the proudest moments of my career!  This is a tremendous accomplishment for Lee Richardson Zoo and its staff,” said Animal Care Manager Pablo Holguin as he grinned ear to ear beneath his mask.

Ayubu was born on January 20 to Johari and Jabari.  He is their first offspring.  His birth is part of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums’ Species Survival Plan for rhinos.  Based on current local weather predictions, the rhinos should be outdoors late morning to mid-afternoon during the first part of the week.  That is subject to change depending on outdoor conditions.

Eastern black rhinos are native to eastern Africa (Kenya and Tanzania). They are listed as Critically Endangered by the IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature).  Be sure to check the zoo’s Facebook page, YouTube channel, and website for video updates.


It’s a Girl! Rare Black Rhino Calf Born in Dubbo

Taronga Western Plains Zoo in Dubbo is celebrating the birth of a critically endangered Black Rhino calf, born in the early hours of the morning on Wednesday 24 February 2021.

Keepers arrived at work on Wednesday to find the female calf standing beside mother Bakhita in the Zoo’s behind-the-scenes calving yard.

“This is the fourth calf for experienced mother Bakhita, who is the Zoo’s most successful Black Rhino breeding female and also the first female Black Rhino born here,” said Taronga Western Plains Zoo Director, Steve Hinks.

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Keepers are currently monitoring Bakhita and her calf via CCTV cameras to allow them plenty of space to develop their bond and ensure both mother and calf remain calm.

“This calf is especially important as it carries the legacy of our Black Rhino breeding bull, Kwanzaa who sadly passed away in 2020.”

“Kwanzaa played a prominent role in the Black Rhino conservation breeding program here in Dubbo, siring four calves, and it is such a great feeling to see his final calf arrive safely,” said Steve.  

Both mum and calf are doing well and will remain behind-the-scenes for the next couple of months. This time is important for both mum and calf to bond and to allow the calf to grow and develop before making the move to the Black Rhino paddock on the Zoo circuit.

“The team will provide regular updates on our newest addition via Taronga TV and social media whilst the calf is behind-the-scenes,” said Steve.

Taronga Western Plains Zoo has been very successful in breeding Black Rhinos throughout the history of the conservation breeding program which commenced in the 1990s. This is the fourth calf born into the program in the last six years.

“Our team that care for this species here at the Zoo are experts in their field and this latest success is a testament to their knowledge, husbandry skills and dedication in conserving this remarkable species.” 

Black Rhinos are currently listed as critically endangered with estimates that there are less than 6000 remaining in the wild.

Taronga Western Plains Zoo is internationally renowned for its Black Rhino conservation breeding program and actively funds and supports conservation efforts for wild rhinos in Africa, Indonesia and India. Funding and support for habitat protection and restoration, anti-poaching and rhino protection units and the reduction of human-animal conflict are all vital to ensure Rhino species will continue to survive in the wild.


Lee Richardson Zoo announces birth of critically endangered black rhino

Lee Richardson Zoo is elated to announce that Johari, a critically endangered black rhinoceros who lives at the zoo, gave birth to a healthy baby boy at approximately 1:30 p.m. on January 20th.  Mother and baby are both doing well.  This is the first black rhinoceros born at Lee Richardson Zoo.

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Continue reading "Lee Richardson Zoo announces birth of critically endangered black rhino" »


A Year in the Life of Willi The Baby Southern White Rhino

Willi the Rhino turned one year old on Friday, January 8. The southern white rhinoceros was born at Zoo Dortmund zoo on January 8, 2020 at 10:55 p.m. Let’s look back on a year in which Willi inspired Dortmund and its visitors with his curious, open-minded and blustery style. The Zoo has put together is video of best moments of his first year in the world.

The video shows, among other things, Willi's birth, his first playful fight with his mother Shakina, first trips to the outdoor area, which he apparently processed shortly afterwards in a dream, the first attempt to eat hay even though he had no teeth, the first direct encounter with rhinoceros grandma Natala, with rhinoceros cow Jasira and finally his father Amari. The young rhinoceros romped around a lot with Amari, usually until she stopped romping. But Willi was also always very open to his keepers, as the scene with the massage shows.

All the best, dear Willi!

Text and editing: Marcel Stawinoga / @zoolotse


Baby Boom Continues at The Wilds!

Cumberland, OH – There’s a baby boom of sorts happening at The Wilds and the team is buzzing with excitement as they celebrate the birth of a third white rhinoceros. The male calf was born on December 24, 2020 in the rhinos’ large, heated barn. This calf is the 25th white rhino to be born at The Wilds. 

Southern White Rhino Calf 03 2412 - Grahm S. Jones  Columbus Zoo and Aquarium
Southern White Rhino Calf 03 2412 - Grahm S. Jones  Columbus Zoo and Aquarium
Southern White Rhino Calf 03 2412 - Grahm S. Jones  Columbus Zoo and Aquarium
Southern White Rhino Calf 03 2412 - Grahm S. Jones  Columbus Zoo and Aquarium

Photo credit: Grahm S. Jones, Columbus Zoo and Aquarium

The male calf and his mother, 16-year-old Zenzele, also born at The Wilds, are doing well. The calf appears to be strong and is nursing alongside his mother.

Zenzele, a seasoned mother, is doing well and watching after her little one. This is Zenzele’s fifth calf and the seventh calf that father, Roscoe, has sired. Roscoe was born at the Knoxville Zoo. He moved to the Seneca Park Zoo when he was 2 years old and has been living at The Wilds since 2014.

It was a busy December at The Wilds! On December 9, a female white rhino calf was born to mother, Kifaru, and on December 18, a male white rhino calf was born to mother, Kali. All three calves were sired by Roscoe. The Animal Management team says that the two older calves have been physically introduced to one another, taking part in fun and energetic playdates. They have also met the most recent arrival through the fences and will have a chance to play with him, too. The names of the three calves will be announced soon!

The Wilds is the only facility outside of Africa that has rhinos born four and five generations removed from their wild-born ancestors. That success continues with this latest birth. Zenzele was the very first rhino to be born at The Wilds and she has lived at The Wilds her entire life. Two of her daughters and two of her granddaughters are still in our herd at The Wilds. This latest newborn is the 11th fourth generation calf.

The pairings of Zenzele and Roscoe was recommended through the Association of Zoos and Aquariums’ (AZA) Species Survival Plan® (SSP). This program is designed to maintain a sustainable population and genetic diversity of threatened and endangered species in human care. The Wilds has also welcomed the births of eight Asian one-horned rhinos since 2005. The most recent Asian one-horned rhino calf, a female named Rohini, was welcomed into The Wilds’ family on August 24, 2019.

“Three baby white rhinoceros calves born in one month—we’re going to have our hands full!” said Dr. Jan Ramer, vice president of The Wilds. “These babies and the rest of our southern white rhino herd are wonderful ambassadors for their wild cousins, giving our guests the opportunity to connect with and appreciate these magnificent animals. We are proud to be leaders within the zoological community in helping to sustain populations of white rhinoceros through the addition of this latest calf.”

“The multigenerational herd is a true testament to our Animal Management team’s expertise and the great care they provide to the animals. White rhinos continue to face many challenges in their native range, and the arrival of each calf is a cause for celebration. Each birth is vital in protecting the future of the species,” said Columbus Zoo and Aquarium President/CEO Tom Stalf.

The white rhino population had dwindled to an estimated 50 to 200 individuals at the beginning of the 20th century. Still, through conservation efforts, the population of white rhinos in their native range in Africa has rebounded to about 20,400 animals. However, even with the increase in numbers, the species remains classified as near threatened by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). All five remaining rhino species in Africa and Asia (white rhinoceros, black rhinoceros, greater one-horned rhinoceros, Javan rhinoceros and Sumatran rhinoceros) are killed by poachers who sell rhino horn for ornamental or traditional medicinal purposes even though there are no scientifically proven health benefits for its use. The horns are made of keratin—the same substance that makes up fingernails and hair. The International Rhino Foundation estimates that one rhino is killed every 10 hours for its horn.

White rhino calves are born after a gestation of 16 months and they can grow to be 4,000 pounds and six feet tall at their shoulder. Their habitats typically consist of plains or woodlands, interspersed with grassy openings. Through reintroduction efforts, their native range has been established in southern and eastern African countries.

Their physical characteristics are two pointed horns and a wide mouth suitable for grazing. The name white rhinoceros originated from the Afrikaans word describing the animal’s mouth – wyd, meaning “wide.” Early English settlers in South Africa misinterpreted the word wyd for “white.”

To further protect the future of rhinos, The Wilds and the Columbus Zoo has provided more than $218,000 in the last five years in support of conservation projects benefiting rhinos in their native ranges, such as monitoring black and white rhinos in Zimbabwe’s Lowveld region through the International Rhino Foundation, protecting black rhinos in the Ngulia Rhino Sanctuary in Kenya through the African Wildlife Foundation and habitat restoration focused on the shortgrass that white rhinos eat through the White Rhinos: Rhinoceros Fund Uganda.

Guests may have the opportunity to view the calves and their mothers, along with the other rhinos in the rhino barn during a Winter at The Wilds Tour. Tours are available at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. through April. Please note that reservations must be made at least 72 hours in advance.

For more information, please visit TheWilds.org and follow The Wilds’ social media accounts on FacebookInstagram and Twitter.


The Wilds Celebrates the Birth of a Second White Rhino Calf This Month

The Wilds is celebrating the birth of the second bundle of joy—in the form of a white rhinoceros—born at The Wilds this month! In the early morning hours of Friday, December 18, 2020, the male calf was born in the rhinos’ large, heated barn.

The calf and his 7-year-old mother, Kali, also born at The Wilds, are doing well and continue to bond. Animal Management staff note that Kali, a first-time mom, is very attentive to her little one and is providing him with exceptional care. This is the sixth calf for 16-year-old father, Roscoe, who was born at the Knoxville Zoo. He moved to the Seneca Park Zoo when he was 2 years old and has been living at The Wilds since 2014.

Southern White Rhino Calf (Boy) 1376 - Amanda Carberry  Columbus Zoo and Aquarium
Southern White Rhino Calf (Boy) 1376 - Amanda Carberry  Columbus Zoo and Aquarium
Southern White Rhino Calf (Boy) 1376 - Amanda Carberry  Columbus Zoo and Aquarium
Southern White Rhino Calf (Boy) 1376 - Amanda Carberry  Columbus Zoo and Aquarium

This calf is the 24th white rhino to be born at The Wilds. On December 9, a female white rhino calf was also born to mother, Kifaru, and father, Roscoe. Kifaru and her calf continue to be doing well and will soon be introduced to Kali and her baby. Both calves are currently unnamed, but names will be announced soon!

The Wilds is the only facility outside of Africa that has had rhinos born four and five generations removed from their wild-born ancestors. That success continues with this birth. Kali is now the fourth fourth-generation female at The Wilds to give birth to the sixth fifth-generation calf. Counting Asian one-horned rhinos, another species that lives at The Wilds, this calf marks the 32nd rhino to be born at The Wilds since the first rhino was born at the facility in 2004.

The pairings of Kali and Roscoe and Kifaru and Roscoe were recommended through the Association of Zoos and Aquariums’ (AZA) Species Survival Plan® (SSP). This program is designed to maintain a sustainable population and genetic diversity of threatened and endangered species in human care. The Wilds has also welcomed the births of eight Asian one-horned rhinos since 2005. The most recent Asian one-horned rhino calf, a female named Rohini, was welcomed into The Wilds’ family on August 24, 2019.

“We are extremely proud of the success of our white rhino program at The Wilds. Tthe multigenerational herd is a true testament to our Animal Management team’s expertise and the great care they provide to the animals. White rhinos continue to face many challenges in their native range, and the arrival of each calf is truly a cause for celebration. Each birth is vital in protecting the future of the species,” said Columbus Zoo and Aquarium President/CEO Tom Stalf.

“Welcoming our second white rhinoceros calf this month truly is a wonderful gift. These little ambassadors for their species will touch your heart when you come to visit us for a Winter at The Wilds tour! Thanks to our community’s support, we can continue our important conservation work with threatened and endangered species, and continue inspiring others to take action to help make a positive difference in our world,” said Dr. Jan Ramer, vice president of The Wilds.

The white rhino population had dwindled to an estimated 50-200 individuals at the beginning of the 20th century. Still, through conservation efforts, the population of white rhinos in their native range in Africa has rebounded to about 20,400 animals. However, even with the increase in numbers, the species remains classified as near threatened by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). All five remaining rhino species in Africa and Asia (white rhinoceros, black rhinoceros, greater one-horned rhinoceros, Javan rhinoceros, and Sumatran rhinoceros) are killed by poachers who sell rhino horn for ornamental or traditional medicinal purposes even though there are no scientifically proven health benefits for its use. The horns are made of keratin—the same substance that makes up fingernails and hair. The International Rhino Foundation estimates that one rhino is killed every 10 hours for its horn.

White rhino calves are born after a gestation of 16 months and they can grow to be 4,000 pounds and six feet tall at their shoulder. Their habitats typically consist of plains or woodlands, interspersed with grassy openings. Through reintroduction efforts, their native range has been established in southern and eastern African countries.

Their physical characteristics are two pointed horns and a wide mouth suitable for grazing. The name white rhinoceros originated from the Afrikaans word describing the animal’s mouth – wyd, meaning “wide.” Early English settlers in South Africa misinterpreted the word wyd for “white.”

To further protect the future of rhinos, The Wilds and the Columbus Zoo has provided more than $218,000 in the last five years in support of conservation projects benefiting rhinos in their native ranges, such as monitoring black and white rhinos in Zimbabwe’s Lowveld region through the International Rhino Foundation, protecting black rhinos in the Ngulia Rhino Sanctuary in Kenya through the African Wildlife Foundation and habitat restoration focused on the shortgrass that white rhinos eat through the White Rhinos: Rhinoceros Fund Uganda.

Guests may have the opportunity to view the calves and their mothers, along with the other rhinos in the rhino barn during a Winter at The Wilds Tour. Tours are available at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. through April. Please note that reservations must be made at least 72 hours in advance.


It’s a Girl! The Wilds Celebrates The Birth of a White Rhino Calf

Cumberland, OH – The Wilds is excited to welcome an adorable female white rhinoceros calf, who was born in the rhinos’ large, heated barn during the early morning hours of Wednesday, December 9, 2020.

The calf and her 9-year-old mother, Kifaru, who was also born at The Wilds, are doing well and continue to bond. Animal Management staff note that first-time mom, Kifaru, is being very attentive to her little one and providing her with great care. This is the fifth calf for 16-year-old father, Roscoe, who was born at the Knoxville Zoo. He moved to the Seneca Park Zoo when he was 2 years old and has been living at The Wilds since 2014.

Southern White Rhino Calf 9372 - Grahm S. Jones  Columbus Zoo and Aquarium
Southern White Rhino Calf 9372 - Grahm S. Jones  Columbus Zoo and Aquarium
Southern White Rhino Calf 9372 - Grahm S. Jones  Columbus Zoo and Aquarium

While the calf is currently unnamed, a name will be announced soon! This calf is the 23rd white rhino to be born at The Wilds. The Wilds is the only facility outside of Africa that has had rhinos born four and five generations removed from their wild-born ancestors. That success continues with this birth. The new calf is the fifth fifth-generation white rhino born at The Wilds. Counting Asian one-horned rhinos, another species that lives at The Wilds, this calf marks the 31st rhino to be born at The Wilds since the first rhino was born at the facility in 2004.

The pairing of Kifaru and Roscoe was recommended through the Association of Zoos and Aquariums’ (AZA) Species Survival Plan® (SSP). This program is designed to maintain a sustainable population and genetic diversity of threatened and endangered species in human care. The Wilds has also welcomed the births of eight Asian one-horned rhinos since 2005. The most recent Asian one-horned rhino calf, a female named Rohini, was welcomed into The Wilds’ family on August 24, 2019.

“Wildlife conservation is a top priority for our organization, and we’re extremely proud of the contributions we’re making to help protect the future of rhinos and other threatened and endangered species. The arrival of this calf symbolizes hope and also inspires us as we’re reminded that our work is making a difference,” said Columbus Zoo and Aquarium President/CEO Tom Stalf.

“The birth of a rhinoceros calf is always cause for celebration! Rhinos continue to face many threats in their native range, and every rhino is crucial to the population. This calf joins The Wilds’ herd of important ambassadors – through them we can continue to connect our guests with these wonderful animals, and try to inspire everyone to take action to help,” said Dr. Jan Ramer, vice president of The Wilds.

The white rhino population had dwindled to an estimated 50-200 individuals at the beginning of the 20th century, but through conservation efforts, the population of white rhinos in their native range in Africa has rebounded to about 20,400 animals. However, even with the increase in numbers, the species remains classified as near threatened by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). All five remaining rhino species in Africa and Asia (white rhinoceros, black rhinoceros, greater one-horned rhinoceros, Javan rhinoceros, and Sumatran rhinoceros) are killed by poachers who sell rhino horn for ornamental or traditional medicinal purposes even though there are no scientifically proven health benefits for its use. The horns are made of keratin—the same substance that makes up fingernails and hair. The International Rhino Foundation estimates that one rhino is killed every 10 hours for its horn.

White rhino calves are born after a gestation of 16 months and they can grow to be 4,000 pounds and six feet tall at their shoulder. Their habitats typically consist of plains or woodlands, interspersed with grassy openings. Through reintroduction efforts, their native range has been established in southern and eastern African countries.

Their physical characteristics are two pointed horns and a wide mouth suitable for grazing. The name white rhinoceros originated from the Afrikaans word describing the animal’s mouth – wyd, meaning “wide.” Early English settlers in South Africa misinterpreted the word wyd for “white.”

To further protect the future of rhinos, The Wilds and the Columbus Zoo has provided more than $218,000 in the last five years in support of conservation projects benefiting rhinos in their native ranges, such as monitoring black and white rhinos in Zimbabwe’s Lowveld region through the International Rhino Foundation, protecting black rhinos in the Ngulia Rhino Sanctuary in Kenya through the African Wildlife Foundation and habitat restoration focused on the shortgrass that white rhinos eat through the White Rhinos: Rhinoceros Fund Uganda.

Guests may have the opportunity to view the new calf, Kifaru and Roscoe, along with the other rhinos, in the rhino barn during a Winter at The Wilds Tour. Tours are available at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. through April. Please note that reservations must be made at least 72 hours in advance.

For more information, please visit TheWilds.org and follow The Wilds’ social media accounts on FacebookInstagram and Twitter.