Otter

Asian Small-Clawed Otter Pups Born At Brookfield Zoo

The Chicago Zoological Society, which manages Brookfield Zoo, is happy to announce the birth of six Asian small-clawed otter pups on November 18, 2021. Since their birth, the otter-ly adorable and playful pups have been growing and bonding behind the scenes with their parents, Pearl and Adhi (pronounced AHH-dee). Guests will be able to see the two male and four female pups exploring their habitat in Tropic World: Asia once they are eating solid foods and have become proficient swimmers.

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Meet (And Hear!) Santa Barbara Zoo's Four Otter Pups

(November 18, 2020) Santa Barbara, CA -- The Santa Barbara Zoo is excited to announce that Gail, the Zoo’s female Asian small-clawed otter, gave birth to four healthy pups last Friday. The animal care team did the first health check on the pups yesterday and hopes to confirm their gender next week at a follow-up wellness exam.

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Gail, Peeta (dad), and Berbudi (older brother) all work together as a family to raise the pups, so they will remain off exhibit for one to two months while the pups mature and learn how to swim. Gail last gave birth in 2017. Gail and Peeta are generously sponsored by Peter & Pieter Crawford-van Meeuwen.

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Rescued Sea Otter Pup, Poppy

Poppy the otter pup has come a long way since she was admitted to Alaska SeaLife Center's Wildlife Response Program ❤️

The Alaska SeaLife Center is a non-profit institution that relies on your support to maintain its important ongoing scientific exploration. There are many ways to get involved. Your donations, sponsorship, membership and other contributions are greatly appreciated, and thank you for Supporting the Science!

Poppy: https://www.alaskasealife.org/rescue_rehab_journal/152/427

Donate: https://24092.blackbaudhosting.com/24092/Total-General-Donation


Otter Triplets and A Critically Endangered Infant Part of Drusillas Park’s Summer Baby Boom

Staff and visitors who were lucky enough to catch the first glimpses of Drusillas Park’s (Sussex, UK) tiny baby otters in late August noticed something rather unusual about the triplets – their otter-ly fabulous silver coats!

Born in late July, it appears the pearly pups have all inherited the extraordinary gene from their dad, Cheddar, with each infant boasting the same silvery frosted fur.

Not long after welcoming the new arrivals, Keepers noticed that the babies were nothing like any otter pups they’d seen before, and visitors could enjoy seeing Cheddar and mum, Halloumi-Bee, bring their babes out of the nest for the first time.

The triplets take Drusillas count for otter babies over the last couple of years to seven, bringing positive news for the species’ animal welfare throughout BIAZA collections. Asian short-clawed otters are classified as vulnerable as they are under threat from habitat loss and use in the pet trade, and Drusillas is proud to be contributing once again to animal conservation in this way.

Just a few weeks prior, Drusillas was overjoyed to announce the safe arrival of their ape-solutely adorable newest zoo born - a critically endangered Sulawesi crested macaque baby.

The Zoo team are elated to confirm that the cheeky babe, born on 22nd June to mum Kera and dad Moteck, is perfectly healthy, happy and headstrong, as it starts to brave life outside of the protective hold of its mother. The super cute infant has been delighting visitors by trying out some climbing, swinging, tumbling… and falling!

The Sulawesi black crested macaque is categorised as critically endangered in the wild, and is one of over 20 different endangered and rare species living at the East Sussex Zoo. Sadly the macaque population has declined by 80% over the last 40 years. The principal threat to their survival is over-hunting for meat. In Indonesia the macaque is considered a delicacy, and is often served for special occasions. Deforestation is another major threat to the species, with large areas of their habitat now being cleared for coconut plantations, garden plots and roads. 

“As well as being totally adorable, the cause for celebration is that much more when we successfully breed a critically endangered species at Drusillas.” Continued Gemma, “The healthy arrival of this pair’s second baby provides a crucial boost for the macaque population, and we’re all really proud to play our part in keeping this beautiful primate from extinction.”

Thousands of people put forward names on the Park’s Facebook naming challenge at the beginning of August, and Drusillas have now confirmed that the baby has been named Kiwi!

 


Help Name the North American River Otter Pup at Chicago’s Brookfield Zoo

The public was able to meet one of Brookfield Zoo’s newest additions—a month-old North American river otter—during a “Bringing the Zoo to You” Facebook Live chat on Wednesday, March 3.

The male pup, born on January 20, is being hand-reared by animal care staff after it was determined that his mom, Charlotte, was not able to provide him with the proper nourishment he needed. Staff hope to introduce him back with Charlotte and his dad, Benny, once he is weaned, which will be towards the end of March.

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(credit Jim Schulz/Chicago Zoological Society)

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The inquisitive and playful pup needs a name, and Brookfield Zoo is inviting the public to assist in the final selection. Those wishing, can cast a vote for their favorite on the zoo’s website at CZS.org/OtterName. The name choices are:

  • Chippewa—name of rivers found in the upper Midwest where North American river otters are found
  • Flambeau—a river in north-central Wisconsin also found in otters’ native habitat
  • Pascal—name of otter character in a popular video game
  • Ozzy—just a really a cute name

Voting began Tuesday, March 2, at 11:00 a.m. CT, and continues through Monday, March 15, at 5:00 p.m. CT. The name with the most votes will be announced on Tuesday, March 16.

The Illinois population of North American river otters—fewer than 100 individuals in the late 1980s—was once threatened due to over harvesting and habitat loss. However, a successful recovery program initiated in the early 1990s by the Illinois Department of Natural Resources helped increase the number of otters in the state. The program included relocating nearly 350 otters from Louisiana to central and southeastern Illinois. The state also engaged in conserving wetlands and wooded areas along streams and rivers, which is otter habitat. Today, the species is common throughout Illinois thanks to these effort as well as expanding otter populations in neighboring states.


Three Otter Pups Born to Nkeke and Miles at Potter Park Zoo

Potter Park Zoo's North American river otter Nkeke gave birth to three pups Wednesday, Feb. 3 – almost a year after her last litter.

“This is Miles and Nkeke’s third litter of pups, and while each litter has been exciting, this one is especially so since it is their first set of triplets,” said Carolyn Schulte, Potter Park Zoo otter keeper. “Nkeke is an experienced mom and thanks to her excellent relationship with the keepers we have been able to monitor the pup’s growth closely to ensure they each grow at a healthy rate.”

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At two days old, a quick physical exam was conducted to get a baseline body weight and check for any abnormalities or injuries. The pups weighed in at 107 grams, 88 grams, and 75 grams. Potter Park Zoo Director of Animal Health Dr. Ronan Eustace said triplets can be challenging for an otter to raise.

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Otter Pups Munch On Their Favorite Snack (SOUND UP!)

The five Asian Small-clawed Otter pups born at Zoo Dortmund on November 5th and 6th are hungrier than ever! Since they aren’t nearly as good at digging for black beetle larvae in the bark mulch as their parents Kon and Malou, they try to steal the larvae that Kon and Malou have found directly from their front paws or from their mouths. This behavior can also be seen in adult small-clawed otters, which, in contrast to other otters, are very sociable animals. They live in family groups that can consist of a pair and the offspring of several litters. Family members often seek intensive physical contact with one another, clean each other and also sleep snuggled together in their living and sleeping den. Even if Kon and Malou leave the odd larva to their offspring, as can be seen in this video, they do not always give in to the begging of the pups and enjoy most of the insects themselves.

The pups are still pretty well off though, because they still feed mainly on their mother's milk, even if they already have a healthy appetite for solids! Adolescent dwarf otters are suckled by their mother for about four to five months.

Video and text: Marcel Stawinoga / @zoolotse


Giant Otter Pups Born at Budapest Zoo!

Budapest Zoo has a holiday treat for its friends and fans: the first short film of the giant otter pups born there this fall. The little giants are a real rarity, as this endangered species is kept and bred in very few zoos. In Hungary, they can be only found in Budapest Zoo. The pups were born on October 7th, so the two little ones are now two months old. Although Budapest can only present them in a short film at the moment - as The Zoo is temporarily closed due to the coronavirus pandemic - they are confident that the general public will soon be able to admire them in person!


Twins' Arrival Brings 'Otter' Joy

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The staff at Banham Zoo are ‘otterly' delighted with the birth of two Asian Small-clawed Otter pups. The babies have recently started coming out of the den to play with their one-year-old sibling Makati, mother Tilly, and father Sam.  

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IMG_8692Photo Credit: Banham Zoo

The two cubs were born on May 22 and are the second litter for Tilly and Sam. As experienced parents, Tilly and Sam share care of the pups are showing excellent parenting skills.

For the first eight to 10 weeks of life, Otter pups remain tucked away in the den with mom and dad. In fact, the keepers were only able to discern that Tilly had given birth when she stopped coming outside to be fed. Once the pups were heard squealing from within the nest box there was no doubt that babies had been born.

The pups are now beginning to venture out of their nest box to explore their outdoor habitat. They will soon undergo their first veterinary exam, where their genders will be determined.

In the coming weeks, Tilly and Sam will start giving swimming lessons and impart other essential skills to their offspring, just as they would in their native habitat.  

The Asian Small-clawed Otter is the smallest of all Otter species. These Otters inhabit shallow, fast-flowing waters in southeast Asia and feed on crabs, snails, frogs, young birds, eggs, fish and small mammals. The species is classified as Vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Habitat destruction from farming, water pollution, hunting, and overfishing have led to a rapid decline in the Otters’ numbers in the wild. The IUCN estimates the global population of Asian Small-clawed Otters has declined by up to 30% over the last 30 years.

See more photos of the Otters below.

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