Elephant

Brazos Blitz – A Super Bowl Prediction

Fort Worth Zoo Asian elephant calf predicts Super Bowl LVI winner

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 FORT WORTH, Texas – An ele-fan favorite Fort Worth Zoo resident, baby Asian elephant Brazos, made quite the play Thursday, Feb. 10 by predicting that the Los Angeles Rams will win Super Bowl LVI this Sunday. The field was set with two boomer balls (elephant-sized footballs), each painted with the respective teams’ logos – Los Angeles Rams and Cincinnati Bengals. With his No. 1 cheerleader, mom Bluebonnet, on the sidelines, Brazos took the field and never looked back. Without hesitation, the 600-pound, 5-star recruit tackled the Rams boomer ball for the official pick!

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Brazos The Baby Elephant Is 3 Months Old!

Weighing in at a whopping 540 lbs, Brazos turned months old Friday! These days are all about his toys and his trunk. He’s often kicking his ball around or picking up small tires and running with them around his trunk. He’s practicing throwing dirt and sand onto his back (the dirt acts as a natural sunscreen and insect repellent!), but for now he only takes small amounts that barely reach past his head. He’s testing out more and more foods while his teeth grow bigger, and he regularly reaches for lettuce over other options. You might catch him in the main habitat participating in short target training sessions with his keepers.

Don’t forget to utilize Fort Worth Zoo's Brazos forecast when planning your trip to the Zoo. When days are warm enough, he’ll be in the main yard from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. with his mom, Bluebonnet.


Baby Elephant Gains Confidence at Omaha Zoo

Under Kiki’s watchful eye, her calf continued exploring the calf training area at Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo last week!

Each day, she becomes more and more interested in her environment, especially smaller enrichment items she can push and move at her age, such as a firehose cube.

Getting used to this space also means getting more comfortable on the scale. The calf’s natural curiosity—and the trusting bond mom has with our keeper staff—has her freely walking about the scale’s surface.

📹: Jillian Voss, senior elephant keeper


OKC ZOO CELEBRATES BIRTH OF ENDANGERED ASIAN ELEPHANT CALF

It’s a boy! Both mother, Asha and newborn calf are healthy, spending time together bonding.

OKC Zoo Asian Elephant Family

The Oklahoma City Zoo and Botanical Garden is proud to announce that Asian elephant, Asha, 26, has given birth to a healthy, male calf. Wildlife fans around the world have been anticipating the arrival of the OKC Zoo’s newest elephant calf since Asha’s pregnancy was announced in 2020 and now, the wait is over – he’s here! Rama, Sanskrit for pleasing, was born on Thursday, January 20, 2022, at 8:26 p.m., inside the Zoo’s elephant barn at Sanctuary Asia. The Zoo’s veterinary and elephant caretaker teams report that Asha’s delivery went smoothly and she and Rama are in good health and have been spending time together bonding. Rama is the fourth calf to be born at the Zoo and the fourth offspring for Asha, bringing the total number of Asian elephants at the Zoo to eight.

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Elephant Calf At 4 Days Old

Omaha Zoo’s newest addition is going on Day 4 into the world and is visibly more coordinated and mobile! Kiki's calf has done some nursing and like everyone else, enjoys a good snooze. (Being cute is sure rough!) Saturday night alone, the calf slept a lot, off and on from 6 p.m. – 5:30 a.m. This is known as recumbent sleep. Jayei, the matriarch of the herd, has been a big help along the way, not only mentoring Kiki, but also looking out for the calf as if it were her own.


Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo & Aquarium Welcomes First Elephant Calf

Omaha, NE (January 7, 2022) - Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium is excited to announce Kiki, an 18-year-old African elephant, gave birth to a calf at 11:33 a.m. today. Mom and calf are doing well. The gender and weight of the calf are unknown at this time. The calf is the first elephant born at the Zoo. Learn more in the video description.

IMG_2607 - Kiki Calf

Animal Care Staff implemented a 24-hour watch for Kiki Thursday, January 6, when they noticed a continual drop in her progesterone levels, indicating labor would take place soon.

Kiki delivered the calf with all females in the herd present. At this time, the Elephant Family Quarters will remain closed to the public to allow Animal Care Staff time to observe bonding, maternal behaviors and nursing.

Callee, the father, is 21 and joined Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo & Aquarium in 2019. The Zoo is awaiting the arrival of a second African elephant calf also due this winter.
Visitors will have the opportunity to reserve a timed ticket to see the calf with the herd in the Elephant Family Quarters once reopened.

Updates about the elephants and timed ticketing will be provided via media alerts and the Zoo’s social media pages as additional information becomes available.

Consistently ranked as one of the world’s top five zoos, Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium is an independent not-for-profit organization accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA). The Zoo is recognized nationally for its conservation, animal care and exhibit design. As a leader in conservation, the Zoo’s Center for Conservation and Research focuses on areas to benefit animal husbandry and species conservation including conservation genetics, conservation medicine, reproductive sciences and comparative nutrition. More information is available at www.OmahaZoo.com.


Sound The Trumpets! Fort Worth Zoo Celebrates Asian Elephant Birth

Fort Worth Zoo staff welcomed a 37-inch-tall, 255 pound male Asian elephant calf on Oct. 21, 2021. Brazos (BRA-zus) is the fourth calf born at the Zoo following his mother Bluebonnet in 1998 and his aunt Belle and half-brother Bowie, both born in 2013. As you can see, mother and calf are doing well, spending time bonding in the backyards of the Zoo.

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Since establishing its elephant breeding program in 1986, the Fort Worth Zoo has become an international leader in elephant conservation. In 1998,the Zoo spearheaded the development of the International Elephant Foundation (IEF), a conservation organization dedicated to saving elephant species worldwide. Listed as endangered since 1976, Asian elephant populations continue to decline and if the trend continues, zoos are going to be the only place left for these animals. The birth of Brazos is another BIG conservation success.

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The Columbus Zoo And Aquarium Family Grows By Two With Births Of Elephant Calf And Sea Lion Pup

There was a flurry of activity overnight at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium as staff welcomed two little ones—an Asian elephant calf and a California sea lion pup! These exciting births are important milestones and offer hope for the future of these species that are at risk in their native range.

Asian Elephant Calf 7560 - Grahm S. Jones  Columbus Zoo and Aquarium

Photo credit: Grahm S. Jones, Columbus Zoo and Aquarium

Asian Elephant Calf

On Wednesday, June 16, 2021 at 8:48 p.m., the Zoo welcomed the much-anticipated birth of a male Asian elephant calf in the Zoo’s Asia Quest region.

As an experienced mother, 33-year-old Phoebe is providing exceptional care to her big bundle of joy. The calf appears to be strong and was observed nursing shortly after birth. While he currently prefers to stand closely between Phoebe’s legs, the calf is also starting to be curious of his surroundings behind the scenes in the Zoo’s elephant and rhino building. He is rather vocal, sometimes emitting a low grumble, and he continues to test out his trunk though he hasn’t quite yet sure figured out how to use it to its fullest potential. Phoebe has remained patient with him and calmly responds to the care team as they observe her and her baby.

Throughout her 22-month pregnancy, the Zoo’s Animal Care team monitored Phoebe closely. Thanks to the incredible bond she shares with her care team Phoebe voluntarily participated in regular ultrasound imaging, which enabled staff to monitor the calf’s development.

The purchase of endocrine equipment in 2018 by donor, Johanna Destefano, allowed the Animal Health team to run daily progesterone tests for Phoebe so they could more accurately predict the birth. On Sunday, June 13, Phoebe’s bloodwork showed that her progesterone levels had dropped enough that the Animal Health and Animal Care teams knew that the birth would happen sometime within the next 72 hours. The Animal Care team shifted from checking Phoebe via remote camera every two hours to monitoring her around the clock and working overnight shifts in the building, where they could be ready to assist as necessary.

Phoebe’s delivery went smoothly, and the arrival of this recent calf is also offering hope for Asian elephant conservation efforts. The pairing of Phoebe and 33-year-old father, Hank, was recommended by the Species Survival Plan® (SSP), a program coordinated by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) to maintain genetic diversity of threatened and endangered species in human care. While Phoebe and Hank had the opportunity to breed, this has been unsuccessful in the past and she was artificially inseminated. Artificial insemination is carefully coordinated by animal health experts and enables an elephant to be impregnated at her most fertile time. While this is still a relatively rare procedure for elephants, most successful elephant artificial insemination attempts (approximately 20 in total) have occurred with African elephants. Artificial insemination is very uncommon with Asian elephants, with less than 10 successful outcomes. Two of these scientific achievements have occurred at the Columbus Zoo (with the first time occurring in Phoebe in 2016). Attempts to artificially inseminate elephants are becoming more frequent to bolster the numbers of endangered elephants, whose populations continue to rapidly decline in their native range.

Phoebe came to the Columbus Zoo in January 2002 and resides alongside the other five Asian elephants in the Asia Quest region—males Hank (this calf’s father) and Beco (Phoebe’s son), and females Connie, Sunny and Rudy. This calf is Phoebe’s fourth calf born at the Columbus Zoo and her fifth calf overall. Her last calf, Ellie, sadly passed away a few weeks after her birth in 2018 due to a bacterial infection despite aggressive treatment by the Animal Health team and outside specialists. Just two other live Asian elephants have been born at the Columbus Zoo throughout the Zoo’s history–Bodhi, who was born in 2004 and now resides at Denver Zoo, and Beco, who was born in 2009 and is still a part of the Columbus Zoo elephant herd.

To provide Phoebe and her new baby with time to continue developing a strong bond, they will remain in a behind-the-scenes area. When they show they are ready, they will also slowly be introduced to other members of the herd. The Zoo will announce viewing information—as well as more information about the calf’s name—for guests as it becomes available.

According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species,™ Asian elephants are listed as endangered in their native range across southern and southeastern Asia and are in decline due to various factors including habitat loss/degradation and poaching. The World Elephant Day organization estimates there are fewer than 40,000 Asian elephants and less than 400,000 African elephants remaining worldwide.

The Columbus Zoo and Aquarium is a long-time supporter of several direct elephant conservation initiatives benefitting both African and Asian elephants, including annual donations to the International Elephant Foundation and several research projects and grants over the last 25 years. Many of these projects have focused on reducing human-elephant conflict and monitoring elephant populations in their native ranges. Additionally, Columbus Zoo staff leads AZA’s SAFE (Saving Animals From Extinction) Asian Elephant Program, an AZA initiative to leverage their large audiences and collective expertise to save animals from extinction. Zoo guests can also learn about elephant conservation and how they can contribute to the sustainability of this endangered species at the Zoo’s Elephant Conservation Station inside the “Vanishing Giants” building located in the Asia Quest region. Zoo veterinary staff also participate in a national Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesvirus (EEHV) advisory group. The group aims to prevent, diagnose and treat this potentially fatal disease that affects elephants in their native range, and in human care.

Sea Lion Pup (Lovell) 7676 - Grahm S. Jones  Columbus Zoo and Aquarium

Grahm S. Jones, Columbus Zoo and Aquarium

California Sea Lion Pup

During the early morning hours of June 17, 2017, the Zoo’s Pinniped team in the Adventure Cove region also had cause to celebrate with the arrival of a sea lion pup!

The pup was born to experienced mom, Lovell, who will be turning 6 years old in July. Lovell is being very attentive to her nursing pup, whose sex has not yet been determined. The pup is already quite active but won’t be ready for swim lessons with mom until Lovell determines her calf is ready. For now, they will continue to bond behind the scenes.

Lovell arrived at the Zoo along with nine other sea lions (six males, three females) and four harbor seals (one male, three females) on May 17, 2020. Because the sea lions all live together for most of the year in a strong social group and there are several males, the father of the pup is currently unknown and will be determined through a blood test.

This most recent pup is the third sea lion pup ever to be born at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium. The first sea lion pup, a female named Sunshine, was also born to Lovell on June 25, 2020. Sunshine still resides at the Columbus Zoo and has become independent of Lovell, making friends with other sea lions. The second sea lion pup at the Columbus Zoo was born to mom, Baby. When the team noticed that male pup, Norval, was not gaining enough weight, they stepped in to assist Baby by providing Norval with supplemental tube feedings. He continues to thrive, and Columbus Zoo guests can sometime catch him with Sunshine and another sea lion, Banana.

Guests can find the sea lions at the Zoo’s newest region, Adventure Cove, which opened in 2020. Thanks to the support of voters who passed the last levy and contributions from generous donors, the Columbus Zoo began construction in October 2017 on this brand-new, state-of-the-art region. Adventure Cove features a Pacific Northwest-inspired rocky coast and harbor setting for the sea lions and seals; Jack Hanna’s Animal Encounters Village, a colorfully-themed and immersive village highlighting animals from all around the world; and updated existing attractions.

Adventure Cove also furthers the Zoo’s commitment to sea lion rehabilitation initiatives led by institutions accredited by the AZA. The Columbus Zoo has provided financial support for years for rescue and rehabilitation efforts by The Marine Mammal Center (MMC) in Sausalito, Calif., and the Zoo’s Animal Health staff have trained with the MMC to nurse stranded and injured marine mammals back to health while expanding their knowledge of sea lions and seals.

Although California sea lions are not listed as a species of concern, the situation for sea lions in their native range is increasingly dire because there are a rising number of pup strandings. As climate change forces the mothers to hunt further away from shore, more of them are not coming back, leaving pups orphaned and unable to care for themselves. The MMC takes in many of these animals and works to restore them to health.

While Lovell and her pup will likely stay in the behind-the-scenes area for the near future to continue to bond and so that Lovell and the sea lion care team can ensure that the baby meets all of the important growth and development milestones (including swimming) before graduating into the larger habitat, guests who reserve a Behind the Marina Sea Lion Tour will have the opportunity to catch a glimpse of the pair and learn more about this intelligent, playful species. The experience is one of several new offerings designed to further inspire guests to connect with wildlife and take action to help protect these species’ future. Additional information can be found on the Zoo’s website under the Tours and Virtual Experiences page


Bouncing Baby Boy Elephant, Teddy, Born At The Houston Zoo

Just two months after baby elephant Winnie was born, there’s a new pachyderm in the herd! Sunday at 8:04 p.m., 37-year-old Asian elephant Tess gave birth to a 391-pound male, and the calf began to nurse within hours. The calf has been named Teddy by the team who have dedicated their lives to the care, well-being, and conservation of these incredible animals.

“Our animal team is thrilled that the birth has gone smoothly,” said Lisa Marie Avendano, vice president of animal operations at the Houston Zoo. “We look forward to continuing to watch Teddy and Tess bond, and introducing him to Houston.”

Tess gave birth in the McNair Asian Elephant Habitat cow barn under the supervision of her keepers and veterinary staff. She and the calf will undergo post-natal exams and spend several days bonding behind the scenes before they are ready for their public debut. During the bonding period, the elephant team is watching for the pair to share several key moments like communicating with mom and hitting weight goals.

Tess is also mother to Tucker (16), Tupelo (10) and Tilly (2), and grandmother to Winnie, born March 10. This calf raises the number of elephants in the Houston Zoo herd to 13—six males and seven females.

Over the next several years, the Zoo animal care team will watch the young elephant for signs of elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV). EEHV is the most devastating viral disease in elephants worldwide. It occurs in elephants in the wild as well as those in human care such as in sanctuaries and zoos.

The Houston Zoo is an integral part of finding treatments and developing management strategies for the virus. The Zoo’s veterinarians and elephant care team established a research collaboration in 2009 with herpes virologist Dr. Paul Ling at Baylor College of Medicine’s Department of Virology and Microbiology, which recorded significant advancements in the study of EEHV, and toward a vaccine.

The Houston Zoo’s EEHV testing methods, treatment protocols, and experience serve as a global elephant care resource and have contributed to saving elephant calves around the world.

Just by visiting the Houston Zoo, guests help save baby elephants and their families in the wild.  A portion of each Zoo admission and membership goes to protecting wild elephants in Asia. The Zoo provides support, equipment, and training for local researchers to place satellite collars on wild elephants and track them in Asia.  The Zoo’s Malaysian conservation team is now watching over and protecting three groups of wild elephants with babies in Borneo. The data collected from these groups will inform future national protection plans for elephants.