Brookfield Zoo

Puggle—a Baby Short-beaked Echidna—Hatches at Brookfield Zoo

First Time Egg-Laying Mammal, Hatches at Zoo

Brookfield, Ill. — The Chicago Zoological Society, which manages Brookfield Zoo, is happy to announce the hatching of a short-beaked echidna (pronounced ih·KID·nuh). The hatching of this baby echidna, which is called a puggle, is a first in the zoo’s history. Echidnas are very unique. They are one of only two mammal species (the duck-billed platypus is the other) that are in the order Monotremata, or mammals that lay eggs.

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Ali The Gorilla Has Turned 4!

Cuteness overload alert at Brookfield Zoo! In honor of Ali gorilla's 4th birthday yesterday, we've shared a montage of some of her most adorable antics over the years. We bet you can't stop from smiling while you watch!

Ali was born at Brookfield Zoo in 2018 to mom Koola and is part of the Zoo’s western lowland gorilla troop in Tropic World. Western lowland gorillas are critically endangered primarily due to commercial hunting for the bushmeat trade, diseases such as the Ebola virus, as well as the illegal pet trade and habitat destruction from logging. It is estimated that there are approximately 200,000 western lowland gorillas in their native West Africa habitat (the forests of Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Nigeria, Congo, and Angola), and almost 350 western lowland gorillas living in accredited North American zoos. Adopt Ali today and be part of her care and support!

https://czs.org/AliGorilla


Mexican Wolves Born at Brookfield Zoo Venture Out of Den

Three Pups Fostered with Pack in New Mexico to Help Wild Mexican Wolf Population

Brookfield, Ill. — The Chicago Zoological Society (CZS), which manages Brookfield Zoo, is thrilled to announce the birth of five Mexican wolves. The litter was born on April 26 to 3-year-old Vivilette. Two of the month-old male pups have begun to venture out of their den to explore their surroundings at the zoo’s Regenstein Wolf Woods habitat, while their three siblings were released to the wild as part of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s (USFWS) Mexican Wolf Recovery Plan.

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To enhance the genetic diversity of the wild population, USFWS recommended three of the pups from Brookfield Zoo’s litter become part of the fostering program. On May 5, a Chicago Zoological Society senior veterinary technician and lead animal care specialist accompanied the 10-day-old pups—two males and one female—on a flight to New Mexico, courtesy of LightHawk Conservation Flying, a nonprofit organization that partners pilots with organizations to help transfer endangered species to new homes among other conservation projects. The pups were then successfully placed in the den of the Whitewater Canyon wolf pack by the Mexican Wolf Interagency Field Team.

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South American Tapir Born at Brookfield Zoo

Brookfield, Ill. — The Chicago Zoological Society, which manages Brookfield Zoo, is happy to announce the birth of a male South American tapir calf on May 22.  Beginning, May 26, zoogoers will be able to see 11-year-old mom Sorghum (pronounced SOAR-gum) and her yet-to-be-named calf indoors at the Pachyderm House. Once the weather warms a little, they will have access to their outdoor habitat, located on the north side of the building.

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Credits: Lynette Kleisner/CZS-Brookfield Zoo

Following a 13-month gestation, Sorghum gave birth to the approximately 20-pound calf. Throughout her pregnancy, the zoo’s veterinary staff was able to monitor the fetus with regular ultrasounds. To accomplish this voluntary behavior from Sorghum, animal care specialists used positive reinforcement to desensitize the 550-pound mother-to-be to the sound of the ultrasound machine, the smell of rubbing alcohol and gel used on the ultrasound probe, and the feeling of the probe on her belly.

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Brookfield Zoo Welcomes a Porcupette

Brookfield, Ill. – On March 19, the Chicago Zoological Society, which manages Brookfield Zoo, welcomed a new addition—a porcupette (baby porcupine) who was born on March 19. The newborn is being handreared by animal care staff after it was observed the porcupette’s mom, 9-year-old Lucia, was not providing her offspring proper maternal care.

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The unsexed baby porcupine is thriving and being cared for around the clock by the animal care specialists. Currently, the porcupette is fed a formula, which was developed by CZS’s director of nutrition. As the baby develops, times between each feeding will increase until it is weaned at around 10 weeks old. Once weaned, staff will begin introducing the young porcupine to a diet consisting of a variety of vegetables, including sweet potato, green beans, corn, carrots, spinach, and kale, as well as a nutrient-based biscuit, peanuts, and sunflower seeds.

MORE PHOTOS BELOW!

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Hand-raising A Humboldt Penguin Chick

Brookfield, Ill. —A month-old Humboldt penguin chick, who hatched at Brookfield Zoo on February 2, is growing by leaps and bounds. The chick is only the second successful offspring for parents—14-year-old Divot and 21-year-old Rosy—making its hatching extremely significant to the Humboldt penguin population in Association of Zoos and Aquariums’ (AZA) accredited North American institutions.

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MORE PICS BELOW THE FOLD!

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Names Chosen for Brookfield Zoo’s Asian Small-clawed Otter Pups

Brookfield, Ill. — The two male and four female Asian small-clawed otter pups born at Brookfield Zoo on November 18, 2021, were recently named. They are Otto, Otis, Wishes, Hermione (pronounced Her-My-O-Nee), Sachiko (pronounced SAH-chee-ko), and Olivia.

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The six pups are thriving and bonding with their parents, Pearl and Adhi (pronounced AHH-dee), behind the scenes. This past month, the otter-ly playful pups have begun eating a diet of fish and have begun exploring a small pool of water, which animal care specialists were able to capture on video. If the pups continue to demonstrate their proficient swimming abilities, staff anticipate the pups and their parents will be able to have access to their habitat at Tropic World: Asia in early March.

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The smallest of the otter species, Asian small-clawed otters are native to Indonesia, southern China, southern India, Southeast Asia, and the Philippines. The species is listed as vulnerable on the International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List of Threatened Species. Population numbers are declining due to several threats, including residential and commercial development, deforestation, the illegal pet trade, pollution, climate change, and poaching.

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Asian Small-Clawed Otter Pups Born At Brookfield Zoo

The Chicago Zoological Society, which manages Brookfield Zoo, is happy to announce the birth of six Asian small-clawed otter pups on November 18, 2021. Since their birth, the otter-ly adorable and playful pups have been growing and bonding behind the scenes with their parents, Pearl and Adhi (pronounced AHH-dee). Guests will be able to see the two male and four female pups exploring their habitat in Tropic World: Asia once they are eating solid foods and have become proficient swimmers.

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Dwarf Seahorses Born at Brookfield Zoo

Since mid-September, there has been a baby boom of dwarf seahorses born at Brookfield Zoo’s Living Coast. Nearly 30 seahorse fry (name for baby fish) have been born, including nine on November 14. One of the animal care specialists, who cares for them, was at the right place at the right time and was able to capture the amazing moment on his cell phone. The video can be seen on the zoo’s social media channels.

The dwarf seahorse is one of the smallest species of seahorse, measuring about a ¼ inch at birth and up to 2 inches when full grown. To provide the best chance of survivability, the seahorses born at Brookfield Zoo are being reared by staff behind the scenes. However, several adult seahorses can be seen in their habitat at the Living Coast.

The seahorse and its close relative, the sea dragon, are the only animals that have a true reversed pregnancy in which the male gives birth to the fry. A female seahorse transfers her eggs to the male, where they are fertilized in his brood pouch. There, the developing seahorses are provided oxygen, nourishment and protection. When he is ready to give birth, the male opens his brood pouch and makes contractions to push out the babies. Once born, the adults have nothing to do with their offspring—the newborn seahorses are independent and fend for themselves.

According to International Union for Conservation of Nature, the dwarf seahorse population is declining due to habitat loss, pollution, residential and commercial development, and human activities.

Video credit: Mike Masellis


World’s Smallest Antelope Born at Brookfield Zoo

Brookfield, Ill. — A Kirk’s dik-dik, one of the world’s smallest antelopes, was born at Brookfield Zoo on October 13. At birth, the not-yet-named male calf weighed just over 1½ pounds. He is currently behind the scenes with his mother. To not disturb the bonding process between Buttons, the 2-year-old mom, and her offspring, animal care staff set up a GoPro camera to get video of the newest addition to share with the public. It can be viewed on the zoo’s social media channels.

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Behind the scenes, there is a nest site, which is where a newborn dik-dik remains hidden for 10 to 20 days. It will nurse for about three to four months. Weaning is attained when the calf reaches a weight of about 4 pounds. Once full grown, the male can weigh up to 14 pounds and measure 14 to 16 inches tall at the shoulder.

This small antelope, native to Africa’s Kenya, Somalia, Tanzania, Angola, and Namibia, got its name from the sound it makes when threatened as well as after Sir John Kirk, a 19th century Scottish naturalist. Its coat varies in color from a yellowish-gray to reddish-brown. The species can be identified best by its large, striking, dark eyes that are each surrounded by a white ring. Only the males grow short corrugated horns. The elongated snout allows a dik-dik to help keep cool by rapidly panting to cool the air, and therefore its body. This system also helps minimize its need for water.

The calf at Brookfield Zoo will not be making his public debut until spring 2022, but guests can see an adult pair in their outdoor habitat during regular zoo hours, weather permitting. Currently, there are 25 Kirk’s dik-diks at 11 accredited North American zoos, including five at Brookfield Zoo.