Brevard Zoo

Brevard Zoo Home to New Jaguar Cubs

IMG_8976Brevard Zoo, in Florida, welcomed a pair of healthy Jaguar cubs on January 27th. The cubs were born to 11-year-old mom, ‘Masaya’, and 13-year-old dad, ‘Mulac’. 

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IMG_9159Photo Credits: Brevard Zoo

The zoo’s new additions come with a few firsts for the zoo and the species. Mulac has never sired any cubs before, which means his genes were not represented in the Jaguar population. These cubs are very valuable, genetically, to Jaguars in captivity. Also, Brevard Zoo was able to install a camera in the den box. This enabled keepers to monitor Masaya as she gave birth, and they were able to see that the cubs were nursing. Masaya has shown herself to be a caring and attentive mother. 

It will still be approximately 3 weeks before the cubs venture out of the den, and it will be about two to three months before the pair will be out on exhibit. The sex of the cubs is not known, yet. Keepers will continue to monitor their growth by weighing them and using photo documentation.

Kerry Sweeney, Curator of Animals, said, “We are very excited with Masaya and Mulac’s new additions and look forward to them being out for guests to see.”

This is the fourth litter of cubs for Masaya. Her first cub, ‘Nindiri’, resides at the San Diego Zoo. ‘Phil’ and ‘Jean’ followed and now reside at the Chattanooga Zoo, and ‘Saban’, who just turned two, lives at the Jacksonville Zoo.

The last published Jaguar captive management plan (2010) noted there were 55 Jaguars (23 males; 32 females) at 26 zoological institutions. The target population size designated by the Felid Taxon Advisory Group, the group designated with overseeing captive felines in Association of Zoos and Aquariums facilities, is 120.

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Meerkat Pups Appear at Brevard Zoo

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The Meerkat mob at Florida's Brevard Zoo is growing! The alpha male and female, Jasper and Kiki, have a new litter of pups, born about a month ago. But they've stayed mostly underground so far, and zoo officials aren't sure how many pups there are yet. The first sighting occured on April 14, when one little pup ventured outside the burrow only to be pulled back inside by mom. Since then, there have been some sporadic sightings. 

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5 meerkatPhoto credit: Brevard Zoo 

Keepers suspected that Kiki was pregnant when the new Meerkat exhibit opened on March 15, and had their suspicions confirmed a few weeks later when she appeared aboveground, suddenly looking a lot smaller. The babies have not yet been rounded up for a health check, but so far, everybody who's been sighted seems normal. 


Brevard Zoo Welcomes a Litter of Capybaras

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Florida's Brevard Zoo has had a flood of births over the past few months, including a litter of Capybaras!

The zoo's Capybaras are a mixed group, with juveniles from previous births as well as a new litter. The six new pups bring the total number of Capybaras at the zoo up to thirteen. 

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4 capy (brackin)Photo credits: Brevard Zoo / Tom Brackin (3, 4)

Keepers are finding that each pup is developing their own personality. While some like to hang out in a group, there are usually one or two that will venture off on their own. They all enjoy spending time with dad and returning to mom to nurse. They are already eating some solid food, which they began doing at just two days old.

Capybaras are the world's largest rodents. They are highly social and live together in groups in the forests and savannas of South America, typically near water.  They are listed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature as a species of Least Concern because of their fairly stable, widespread population. However, some local populations have been drastically reduced or wiped out by hunting for skins. 


It's a Girl! Brevard Zoo Welcomes an Endangered Baird's Tapir

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A female Baird’s Tapir was born on April 2nd at Brevard Zoo. With her mother Josie and father Pewee, she brings the zoo's tapir count up to three. Mom and baby are doing well, bonding behind the scenes.  Both will be on exhibit in the near future. Before this new addition, Josie had given birth to four male offspring and one female.

Baird’s Tapir, an endangered species, tend to live near water sources in dense tropical forest throughout Central America. They are agile runners and swimmers, and will often take shelter in water when disturbed. These ancient herbivores have changed very little in the past thirty-five million years. Their trunk-like snout, called a proboscus, probably evolved more recently within the past few million years. These shy creatures are born with a pattern of spots and stripes that help young to camouflage on the dappled forest floor. The coloration fades as they mature. In the wild, young may stay with their mother for up to two years.

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Often called mountain cows, the Baird’s Tapir the largest indigenous mammal in Central America, and is the national animal of Belize. With the wild population estimated at less than 5,500 individuals, they are listed as endangered by the IUCN. They are threatened by extensive deforestation and habitat fragmentation, as well a local hunting. Brevard Zoo was particularly happy to welcome a female because she is very promising for the captive population. 


Trio of Capybara Babies Born at Brevard Zoo

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Brevard Zoo's Capybara parents Clancy and Bailey welcomed these three blonde babies on St. Patrick’s Day. They are healthy and nursing well. Capybara are herbivores, meaning they eat the leaves of grasses and other plants. They are fussy though, and are known to only eat certain plants and ignore ones they don't like. Only a week after they are born, baby Capybara can eat grass, although they continue to drink mother's milk. 

Capybaras are the world's largest rodent. They live in groups throughout South America in the thick forest areas that grow along bodies of water. They have webbed feet, dense fur and eyes, ears and a nose located high on their head; All to aid them when they spend time in the water, a place they go to look for tender greens to nibble and keep cool in the heat. They have the ability to stay underwater for several minutes, which greatly aids them when the need arises to hide from predators like jaguars, pumas, ocelots and anacondas. Since they can grow up to 4.5 feet long (1.37 m), 25 inches tall (63.5), and weigh up to 150 pounds (68 kg), they are also hunted by human beings for their meat and hide.

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Photo Credit: David Saylor

This is the second litter for parents Clancy and Bailey. Clancy, the sire, was born at the Buffalo Zoo in New York in 2011.  Bailey, the dam, was born at the Alameda Park Zoo in New Mexico in 2010. They have been housed at Brevard Zoo for two years. The pups are on exhibit in the La Selva area of the Zoo and guests are already enjoying watching them play. 


Meet Brevard Zoo's Newest Jaguar Cub

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A Jaguar cub was born at Brevard Zoo in Florida on January 26th. The cub, whose sex has not been determined yet, is bonding well with its mother Masaya.

"I feel so fortunate to be able to work with Masaya and LeBron, the breeding pair," says Kerry Sweeney, a curator at Brevard Zoo. "It isn't easy to introduce a male and female jaguar. The staff did an excellent job in 2010 when these jaguars met, creating a comfortable environment for the pair."

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Photo Credit: Brevard Zoo

Masaya gave birth to her first cub, a female named Nindiri, in 2007. As a part of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums Species Survival Plan, Nindiri traveled to the San Diego Zoo to be paired with a male jaguar. She successfully gave birth to two cubs in 2012. Masaya's brood from 2008, Jean and Phil, were sent to Chattanooga Zoo at Warner Park. 

Read more after the fold. 

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Sixteen Little Webbed Feet! Capybara Babies Born At Brevard Zoo

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On August 2, Brevard Zoo’s Capybara, Bailey, gave birth to a litter of four pups. This is the first Capybara litter born at the Zoo in more than 10 years. Their genders have not yet been confirmed. The entire Capybara family, including first-time parents Bailey and Clancy, can be seen on exhibit in the La Selva loop daily.

Capybaras are the largest rodents in the world, related to chinchillas and guinea pigs. Its common name means "Master of the Grasses”. They are social, semi-aquatic mammals that live in groups found throughout South America, including Panama, Colombia, Venezuela, Brazil, Argentina, French Guyana, Uruguay, Peru, and Paraguay. Capybaras live in densely forested areas near bodies of water, such as lakes, rivers, swamps, ponds and marshes, flooded savanna, and along rivers in tropical forest. They are very vocal animals and communicate through a combination of scent and sound, including purrs, barks, whistles, squeals and grunts. Baby Capybara are typically weaned at about 16 weeks, but can be found nibbling grasses as early as one week after birth.

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Photo Credits: Brevard Zoo 


Baby Saki Monkey Born at Brevard Zoo

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Brevard Zoo’s first Saki Monkey was born on April 27 to first-time mom Chuckie. The baby is a female, but has not yet been named. The 8 year-old mom, or dam, was born at Sacramento Zoo. The sire, Yuki, age 20, was born at Jackson Zoo.

Saki Monkeys are part of the Species Survival Plan through the Association of Zoos and Aquariums. and Chuckie and Yuki are a recommended breeding. Females are desperately needed in the captive population so it is an extra boon that their offspring is a girl. Both mom and baby are on exhibit in the La Selva loop. 

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Photo Credit: Brevard Zoo

 


New Baby Anteater for Brevard Zoo

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The Brevard Zoo in Florida has welcomed its first baby Giant Anteater. The little one, born on January 26 to mother Boo and dad Abner, will hitch a ride on mom's back for the first year of its life. The baby's gender is currently unknown.

“It’s very exciting for us because it’s the first time we’ve had a giant anteater born at the zoo,” said zoo marketing director Andrea Hill. Hills said they do not normally name new animals for about 30 days -- roughly the time it takes for them to adjust and be ready to go out on exhibit. Their group of anteaters are being kept off exhibit until they all adjust to the new baby.

Giant Anteaters are usually solitary mammals in the wild that come together to mate. An adult female gives birth to just one baby, called a pup. Pups are born with a full coat of hair; similar coloring helps the baby blend in so predators can't see it. 

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Photo Credit: Brevard Zoo